Behind The Scenes

Building a Fast and Furious Replica Car can be a fun but challenging endeavor. The enthusiasm is understandable, given the excitement that still exists for these movies. It's the same type of enthusiasm I had for cars as a teenager.   In fact, I couldn't until I got my driver's license before I started working on cars, so I worked on friend's cars. My buddy had a '78 Ford pickup with a 351C and I changed the carb on that. Another buddy had a 69 Mustang and I installed a Paxton blower on that. And so it went for the next 20 years. I had a day job, but after work, I was tinkering on cars.   At 18, I rebuilt my first engine by myself using nothing but at Chilton's repair manual. The car was a 1973 V6 Capri with siamesed exhaust ports and nylon teeth cam/crank gears instead of a timing chain. That was fun!   I learned a couple of things early on: 1) If you don't have the money to do it right the first time, you sure as hell don't have the money to do it a second time. 2) If you don't know what the fuck you are doing, hire someone WHO

Why street racing needs to come back for Fast 9 In September, 2018, I wrote a post outlining why street racing would likely not be making a comeback to the franchise. In the past paragraph of that article, I also outlined how street racing could be a part of the movie. (READ THE ARTICLE HERE). Let's look at some of the reasons street racing needs to come back for Fast 9.   In essence, I said that street racing movies don't sell movie tickets, actions movies do. Hollywood has known for decades that any movie they produce must appeal to the widest range of audiences possible. This is the reason why movies like TopGun have men's volleyball scene and why every freaking movie around has some sort of love story in it.   As I write this article, the Hobbs and Shaw film just released. Although the global opening isn't for two more weeks, the opening box office weekend here in the USA was mediocre - at $65 million, its a fraction of what Fast 7 brought in on its first weekend, but we must remember that this is a spinoff film. $65 million is actually pretty good, but a bit less than the $75

You want Fast and Furious videos? I've got 'em. I've now posted a dedicated page just for video content I'm producing related to the "making of" the movies.   The idea is to put all the content in one location for easy reference. Enjoy!

It's official, folks: John Cena is in per a Tweet he made in early June, 2019.  What does this mean for the storyline? That's anyone's guess, at this point although die-hard fans of the franchise are praying to God that the franchise will move away from the James Bond bullshit and get back to its roots: the car culture. I wrote about this back in September 2018 - Read it HERE - but I have to think that Vin Diesel is smart enough to listen to feedback from fans. I also have a hunch that the franchise is still struggling to close the unanswered questions about Brian's character. I'm hoping that in the last movie, Fast 10, we get some closure.  I truly believe the franchise has to come full circle and as we've learned from other lessons in Hollywood, that often means passing it on to the next generation. Since Dom and Brian's characters both have kids, it would be great to see their passion for cars passed along to those kids in some way. Whether that wil happen or not is anyone's guess, but even if it's the last few minutes of the last movie, I think that would be a

Another one of my favorite questions - this one shouldn't seem hard to understand, but as evidenced by the flood of messages I get daily on this topic, it's a mystery. Let's Start With Supply and Demand Oh, that simple principal that all first-year economics students learn. As a refreshers, the law of supply states that the quantity of a good supplied (i.e., the amount owners or producers offer for sale) rises as the market price rises, and falls as the price falls. Conversely, the law of demand (see demand) says that the quantity of a good demanded falls as the price rises, and vice versa. How does that apply here? Let's talk exclusively about the R34 GT-R (and if we have to, GTTs). The R34 has not been legal in the USA since the MotoRex scandal back around 2006. If you forgot what that was all about CLICK HERE If you DON'T read the referenced article, you'll have no idea what led to this situation. Regardless, they're not legal until 25 years after the date of manufacture. In other words, if you want any 1999 Skyline, GT-R or otherwise, you're not getting one here LEGALY under 2024. Period. Take this as a fact so that we can

This behind the scenes 2 fast 2 furious video showcases so many of the tricks used to produce this movie. What was really interesting is how primitive CG was beack in 2002/2003. I worked closely with Al Desario in this film (among others) as we prepared the cars for their big stunt scenes. Enjoy the Video            

Dom's Charger specs remain a bit of a mystery to most people. For starters, just as we did with the other cars in this movie, we had multiple copies of the cars. A quick refresher - in this movie, we would have a "Hero" car.  The term "Hero" doesn't mean it's driven by the hero of the film, it means that this was the nicest, prettiest, shiniest car of the several we would use.  As far as this movie is concerned, the "Hero 1" title usually meant it had a modified engine with some nice eye-candy under the hood, and the interior might have had numerous mods or accessories not found on the stunt cars. The Hero cars are used in "principal photography - in clear English, they're used for 1st Unit filming. For those who don't know, 1st Unit refers to the part of the film crew that focuses on the sequences where actors will appear. 2nd Unit refers to the film crew that focuses on filming the stunts. It's important to note that for this movie, we used TWO Hero cars for each car we cast. In short, for every car we picked, we'd have two pretty Hero cars and two

Today, we delve into the burning question - one that has baffled fanboys and newcomers to the Fast & Furious phenomena for the last few years. Truthfully, I'm baffled that so many people don't understand that you can't really drive a car with just one brake caliper. So, in order to set the record straight, I'm answering that question once and for all right here. If I directed you to go this post from one of my social media posts, good for you - you're not as lazy as some people. First off, you have to understand what was going on behind the scenes. When filming these movies, we had multiple copies of every major car. For my Supra for example, we had three identical clones. Clones are needed for use as stunt cars. It went like this: The prettiest, shiniest, most modified version of my Supra was my actual car which was called the "Hero 1" car. We made a clone of that car as back up and dubbed it the "Hero 2" car. This car is used for situations where Hero 1 is not available. Another pair of clones were dubbed "Stunt 1" and "Stunt 2."  These cars are used for all the crazy

For starters, it's important to note that the tuner market isn't dead at all - it has evolved. It's important to give a little background for younger readers who weren't there to live through it so that they can make sense of its roots and its evolution.   The 1990s In the 1990s, people really started modifying cars like the Honda Civic, Acura Integra and other imported 4 and 6 cylinder Japanee cars. Many of these people were simply customizing cars that were handed down by their parents or were affordable enough for a young person of modest means to reasonably finance. Like any true hot-rodder, these people wanted to personalize their cars. This tradition goes back to at least the 1950s.   By the late 1990s, several magazines had emerged that would showcase their efforts. Magazines like Super Street, Sport Compact Car, Import Tuner and Turbo, Later on, other titles jumped into the foray including HCI, Modified and MaxPower USA. In Europe, they were already producing great magazines like OptGezet, Redline, MaxPower UK and many, many others. The trend was now global.   Car shows like Hot Import Nights, Import Showoff, Extreme AutoFest and the NOPI show were among the biggest in the USA. NOPI, run

I get quite a few comments week from hardcore car friends who lament my predilection for DCT transmissions over manual transmissions. I feel like I need to explain myself - after all, my readers deserve to hear the cold, hard, truth. This is an argument that I also see raging online and what always confuses the issue is when people who truly know very little about cars make claims not supported by data.   First, a little background on my own personal experiences. From the time I first acquired my driver's license back in the early 1980s, I always viewed automatic transmission equipped cars as rubbish. I wanted to row gears, learn how to heal and toe downshift and blaze through canyons, connected corners and nailing the blip-throttle on each downshift. I've owned 40+ cars. I learned how to race at several racing schools starting with Bondurant in 1988. I just loved shifting gears and still do.   All of the cars I've owned (with except for my commuter cars) were manual transmission cars with two exceptions - my 2002 BMW M3 (SMG) and my current ride, my 2015 Nissan GT-R.When I bought my GT-R, no manual was available and even if it were,